Computer wizardry?

Forgive me blogfather for I have sinned, it has been 56 days since my last blog.

I’ve been busy though – our first draft layout of Writers of Influence: Shakespeare to J.K Rowling is now ready for our exhibition officer to look at and tweak. We’ve followed the layout of the exhibition at Sheffield as closely as possible, but there are inevitable changes that need to be made – our walls are different sizes, so what fits comfortably at Sheffield doesn’t necessarily fit in our gallery, we have to fit a grand piano into the gallery, and we cannot have the display cases free-standing. All-in-all, it means we have to condense the spaces between the works of art and consider moving some works in order to make them fit.

Gallery from above

Gallery from above

Intro and section 1

Intro and section 1

Section 1 into section 2

Section 1 into section 2

With these images you can see how working on a computer allows you to visualise the works hanging in one of our galleries.

There are positive and negative aspects to working in this way:

Positives include – accuracy to within a millimetre, the ability to position a camera inside a gallery and have a look around, and the ability to quickly change things when they are not ‘working’ in the space.

Negatives include – some people find it difficult to move away from model making out of card, the colours are not always accurate, and it is reliant on accurate measurements of the framed dimensions of works of art.

If you have a look at our Flickr page for the installation of our recent exhibition Sir Joshua Reynolds: The Acquisition of Genius, you can see the computer program in action. I planned the whole exhibition on the computer months in advance, so all we had to do for the very complicated install process was measure and mark the positions of the works in the gallery – easy!

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